Karl Borgeson

bowl
Photo by Karl Borgeson Ceramics

“I think it was because of all these new, young teachers who had just gotten their MFAs and were coming to teach where I was going to school. They were all, you know, totally into their own work and teaching. They were young and vibrant, and I thought ‘Wow, I want to be one of them.’ The fire in them impressed me.”

The Future of Free Speech for College Students in Wisconsin

Students
Photo by Barbara Miner

College students across America have long been at the forefront of the First Amendment conversation. Campuses have frequently been the epicenter for confronting controversial issues and feeling out social discourse through oratory and protest. Accordingly, higher education institutions have historically struggled to balance the free speech rights of students against those of invited guest speakers. Currently, much of the public dialogue taking aim at the First Amendment and what constitutes protected speech is wrapped up in NFL protests and tweets from high-profile national politicians. However, here in Wisconsin, administrative crackdowns on campus protest are taking center stage in the conversation on First Amendment rights and who they are designed to protect.

Jason Hafeman

Project Home receiving a donation from Group Health Cooperative
Photo by Project Home

Isaac Newton would later reiterate this quote to state that the credit to his achievements belongs to those who came before him as much as they do himself. After speaking with Jason Hafeman, I find his attitude just as much shares in the humble nature of these persons through his efforts and successes with Project Home and Dane Buy Local.

The virtues of strong communities are often found in cycles of reciprocity, but it all starts with someone reaching out. It wasn’t too long ago the lingering shade-reborn we call “the economy” found itself on death’s doorstep once again. Jason recalls, “I was a new dad. I had a one-year-old son, and here I am. I lost my job. My wife had recently finished nursing school and was working part-time. It was tough.”

Unlocking the Closet

open door

For the past year, I have written about leaving a life of should. I have shared how I did what my father wanted me to do, how other traumatic events molded who I was, and how my whole life was about pleasing other people. Now I want to talk about coming out of the closet—but it’s not what you think. I’m not talking about my sexual orientation, although I do identify as queer, I’m talking about a larger closet that encompassed all of who I was. The closet that was filled with thoughts that controlled me and allowed others to control me. It was the closet of should.

A Far from Ordinary Experience: Paoli Schoolhouse Shops & Café

Wild Salmon – Miso Marinated, Sake Butter, Cucumber Relish, Asparagus, Herbed Rice
Photo by Eric Tadsen

So close to everywhere and far from ordinary, Paoli Schoolhouse Shops & Café is likely to inspire diners to leave the hustle and bustle of Madison to enjoy serene country dining next to the Sugar River. Over the short 10-minute drive, the scenery changes to green grass, fields, and farms, hinting at the bona fide fresh and local ingredients of the venue that lies ahead.

Individual Tax Change Highlights

tax forms

Under the rules in effect prior to 2018, seven income tax rates apply to individuals: 10, 15, 25, 28, 33, 35, and 39.6 percent. The new tax law retains seven tax rates, but modifies them as follows: 10, 12, 22, 24, 32, 35, and 37 percent. As under the prior law, rates increase with taxable income, and the income ranges for each bracket vary depending on filing status (single, married filing jointly/surviving spouse, married filing separately, or head of household).

Build-A-Brewery

Brewing
Photo by Kyle Jacobson

Almost every homebrewer I’ve met has sat down with one of their beers and thought, “I should open a brewery.” It’s a passing thought, but what’s not to like? Brew your own beer, run the bar like iZac or Ted Danson, and enjoy the fruits of your labor day in and day out. I asked my old brewing friend if he was still thinking about opening his own brewery. His response was along the lines of, “Why would I do that to myself?”

Pasture and Plenty

Sandwich
Photo by Sunny Frantz Photography

Trying to pigeonhole Pasture and Plenty, one of Madison’s newest eateries, into one simple category is futile—and it comes by design, several years of behind-the-scenes planning, and a vision.

What is simple is the establishment’s mission of cultivating the farm-to-table movement and ensuring people short on time can still nourish their minds and bodies with delicious, nutritious meals. Christy McKenzie, founder of the company, says Pasture and Plenty has established working relationships with more than 30 local farms, ranchers, and bakers.

Pies and Cakes

Apple pies
Photo by Ziegler Photography

When it comes to enjoying the finer things in life, artisan bakers across the Greater Madison area have been creating custom crafted pies, cakes, and other scrumptious, satiating treats with top-tier ingredients, a pinch of passion, and an ounce of love.

Grain to Glass: State Line Distillery

the distillery bar area
Photo by Eric Tadsen

Live local. It’s a lifestyle I often find myself reflecting on. In some ways, we all try to live local, but we choose our battles. One thing I love about this mentality is it demands we pay attention to more than just local things. For as much stress that’s placed on local businesses, suppliers, and artists, the impetus to foster global awareness is essential for the movement’s success. Whether through culture, science, or history, ignorance in facets of the world at large festers a weakness when trying to empower the idea of living local.

Madison Candy Company

Madison Candy Co.
Photo by John Martens

The story of the Madison Candy Company building, 744 Williamson Street, is in its link to Madison’s industrial beginnings and growth. Until the late 19th century there was little manufacturing in Madison due, in part, to the opposition of the city’s leaders, especially those in the professional and academic communities. However, spurred on by inevitable development around the many railroads on Madison’s east side, attitudes changed and city leaders began to see industry as a sign of growth. They also realized the added tax revenues from industry would fund services needed by a growing city.

Savanna Institute

farm outside Sidney, Illinois...agroforestry practices intended to replicate the ecosytems that once covered the Midwest
Photo by Savanna Institute Staff

If you could travel back a few centuries to look at the land we now know as Dane County, you’d see a landscape of waving grasses and wildflowers shaded by scattered trees and shrubs. Large herbivores graze lush foliage that has been managed by native peoples. The highly productive ecosystem is neither a forest nor a grassland, but a bit of both: a savanna. This type of ecosystem, which once covered much of the Midwest, including over five million acres of Wisconsin, was almost entirely converted to farmland after European settlement.

Grain-Free Pet Foods: Fact and Fiction

cat eating

There are a lot of grain-free pet foods on the market today. People think that grain free means allergy free and better nutrition for their dog or cat. Neither is actually true. Contrary to popular belief, grain-free diets do not offer any health benefits over a diet that contains grains. While some of these foods may be perfectly fine for your pet, current research is finding that grain-free foods made with human-grade ingredients are lacking some key nutrients for the health of your pet.

Wilson Creek Pottery: Stoneware is Art that Can Be Used

Wilson Creek Pottery
Photo by Eric Tadsen

The craftsman, artisan, and maker are back in vogue. People who want to know the butcher, baker, and the wine and cheesemaker behind their meals are now looking to add the potter to the list. More and more people are seeking an authentic experience of eating from dinnerware made with creative craftsmanship and craving a connection with the artisan behind it. To them, great food served on a handcrafted plate just seems to feel right.

Food Sports

Wisconsin Grilled Cheese Championship
Photo by Dodgeville Area Chamber of Commerce

Ever since Madison’s local Chef Tory Miller beat Iron Chef Bobby Flay in a head-to-head contest on the Food Network, people have been talking about competitive cooking with a bit of local pride mixed in. This is the emerging world of competitive cooking, where cooking meets competition in a festive atmosphere. Communities are capitalizing on food events as a draw for visitors.

Find Your Healthy Place—Educating Yourself on Natural Solutions

shelves at store
Photo by Apple Wellness

Looking to discover a better version of yourself for the new year? Some may look to aesthetic or external improvements; however, examining the dietary choices you make daily will impact not only how you look, but feel. In a fast-paced world, some of us aren’t getting everything our bodies need. To combat this, some have turned to a natural solution.